Data privacy laws have made significant breakthroughs in recent years, making it a top priority for businesses.  From the adoption of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2016 to the enactment of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) in 2018 and the latest ballot approval of the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) in 2020, we continue to see data privacy laws develop and garner interest from consumers, businesses, and legislators alike.

Specific biometric privacy laws, in particular however, are often overshadowed by more general data privacy laws.  As we discussed in our prior article, biometrics are physical and behavioral human characteristics (i.e., face, eye, fingerprint, and voice features) that can be used to digitally identify a person.  As the collection and use of biometric data become more common in daily life and its applications in different industries continue to expand, new privacy considerations will emerge in this field.  Biometrics laws, in their own right, require separate recognition because of the nuanced application of these specific laws.

The United States does not have a single, comprehensive federal law governing biometric data.  Recently, we have seen an increasing number of individual states focus on this issue, and the recent introduction of legislation in a number of states specifically aimed at protecting the collection, retention, and use of biometric data.  In Part I, we summarize some of the legislative activity on biometric laws from 2020.  We will describe other noteworthy legislation to monitor for 2021 in Part II.


Continue Reading U.S. Biometrics Laws Part I: An Overview of 2020

On November 4, 2020, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) published an Interim Final Rule with Comment Period (IFC) that delays compliance dates necessary to meet certain requirements related to information blocking initially finalized in the ONC Cures Act Final Rule (Final Rule) in March of 2020. The Final Rule implemented health IT provisions enacted under the 21st Century Cures Act (the Cures Act) to achieve ubiquitous interoperability among health IT systems and to improve patient’s ability to access their electronic health information (EHI). Among these provisions is a prohibition of information blocking. This article will define information blocking, provide and explain exceptions to such practice, detail the IFC’s deadline extensions, and highlight key compliance concerns and solutions regarding these reforms.

Information Blocking

The term “Information Blocking” is broadly defined by the Cures Act as any practice that is likely to interfere with, prevent, or materially discourage access, exchange, or use of EHI when the entity knows (or should know) that it is likely to do so. The Cures Act specifies four types of “actors” that must comply with the information blocking rule:

  1. Healthcare Providers
  2. Health information technology companies that have a certified health IT system
  3. Health information networks (HINs)
  4. Health information exchanges (HIEs)


Continue Reading Information Blocking Compliance: What Providers Need To Know As Deadlines Approach

Data privacy is a top concern for many in-house legal professionals – and for good reason – data privacy and cybersecurity legal requirements are complex and continually evolving. Data Privacy Day is a great day to start addressing your organization’s data privacy and cybersecurity needs.

On Data Privacy Day 2021, here is what is top of mind for some of our Data Privacy & Security Team members:

  • Andrew Konia – A Federal Privacy Law: “Calls (pleas?) for federal privacy legislation are nothing new, and last year we came close, with both parties presenting draft bills for consideration (surprise, neither passed!).  But now, with the White House and both chambers of Congress under Democratic control, there appears to be renewed (and more serious) interest in a federal privacy law. We have seen (admittedly narrow) hints of the federal government taking a stronger stance on cybersecurity standards with the IoT Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2020, which applies to federal agency purchases. But you take the recent and intense backlash on “Big Tech’s” use/sharing of data and perceived lack of data transparency, and mix in the Biden Administration’s prioritization of consumer protection generally, and you have the recipe – and a strong political appetite – for a comprehensive federal privacy law.”
  • Bethany Lukitsch – California: “CPRA will be here before we know it, and most companies are going to have a lot to do to get ready. Updating privacy policies and adding ‘do-not-share’ links are one thing, but as with CCPA, it’s the behind-the-scenes work that is really going to take some time.  It’s certainly not too early to get started.”


Continue Reading Data Privacy Day 2021: Privacy and Cybersecurity Are On Our Minds, Too

The end of the Brexit transition period on 31 December 2020 means the UK now has full autonomy over its data protection policies. As of 1 January 2021 the UK is recognised as a ‘third country’ under EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules. The EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement, which is an agreement in principle between the EU and UK, does not yet include a provision for the vast flow of personal data being transferred between the two jurisdictions. The transfer of personal data will be subject to a separate adequacy decision from the EU due in early 2021. This separate adequacy decision will determine whether the EU will allow the ongoing free flow of data from EU/EEA countries to the UK. If an adequacy decision is not granted, then organizations who transfer personal data from the EU/EEA to the UK will have to take additional steps to ensure data being transferred is provided equivalent protections to those under the EEA. The UK has already determined that it considers all EEA/ EU states to be adequate which means that personal data flows from the UK to the EU/EEA will remain unaffected.

Continue Reading The Status of EU–UK Data Flows Following Brexit

In Part II of this series, California-based Ali Baiardo, and London-based Alice O’Donovan, continue their comparison of the GDPR and California privacy law. To view Part I in the series, click here.

NEW DATA PROTECTION PRINCIPLES AND OBLIGATIONS ON BUSINESSES

a. Key data protection principles

The GDPR revolves around seven key data protection principles:

  1. Lawfulness, fairness and transparency;
  2. Purpose limitation;
  3. Data minimisation;
  4. Accuracy;
  5. Storage limitation;
  6. Integrity and confidentiality (security); and
  7. Accountability


Continue Reading California Privacy Rights Act: A Move Closer to GDPR? Part II

A major consumer privacy law is likely this legislative session in Florida that stands to jeopardize not only technology companies, but financial services, healthcare entities, and thousands of small and medium-sized businesses that rely on digital marketing and advertising to conduct business.

Florida legislators are generally pro-business, but this year could be an exception. Talks

The recently-passed California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) augments and supplements California’s existing privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  We are sure many practitioners are wondering how it stacks up with the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). See below for Part I of our two part series comparing the CPRA and the GDPR (and see Part II here).

HOW DOES THE CPRA CHANGE THE CCPA?

The CPRA makes several significant changes to the CCPA:

  • It introduces the concept of “sensitive personal data”;
  • It introduces new obligations on businesses, and GDPR-style “principles”;
  • It introduces new rights for consumers; and
  • It creates a new supervisory authority for data protection and privacy in California — the California Privacy Protection Agency.

These changes are very significant – but do they represent a move closer to GDPR, or a move away?


Continue Reading California Privacy Rights Act: A Move Closer to GDPR? Part I

The November 2020 election left a lot of questions.  Among them, companies doing business in California are now asking about compliance with yet another California data privacy law, this time the California Privacy Rights and Enforcement Act of 2020 (the “CPRA”).  This article gives an overview addressing the what, when, and how of the CPRA.  (We won’t hazard a guess as to the why—we leave that to the backers of the new law.)

What is the CPRA?

The CPRA builds on the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”) in a number of key ways.  It includes: new consumer rights, new requirements for businesses, and a number of other miscellaneous changes.  Some parts of the CCPA will remain in effect, and others are rephrased or clarified.  We provide below a high-level overview of topics we believe businesses should be thinking about now as they look ahead to building-out their CPRA compliance programs.


Continue Reading You’re CCPA Compliant. So Now What? Top Tips for Companies Looking Ahead to the Recently-Passed CPRA

FRENEMIES Podcast logo

The third season in Frenemies has been released — watch these episodes.

  • The One Where California Falls in Love With Privacy: The California Consumer Privacy Act in 10 Minutes (featuring Bethany Lukitsch and Justin Yedor)
  • The One Where “Sale” Doesn’t Mean What You Think: What Is a Sale and Why Does it Matter? (featuring Ali