Continuing our coverage of cybersecurity issues during National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM), we have identified 5 important cybersecurity questions and talking points you can use to start a meaningful cybersecurity conversation at your business.

Counsel and business executives take note: cybersecurity is not just an IT problem, robust cybersecurity starts with a healthy dialogue between legal, business, and IT. The chart below illustrates how failure to engage in meaningful oversight of your company’s data and systems security will create costly, significant, and unnecessary risk.

(https://digitalguardian.com/blog/whats-cost-data-breach-2019)

The good news is that you need not be an IT expert to oversee your company’s cybersecurity risk. You do not need to be able to write code, or to know exactly what software is needed to keep the company’s data secure. The first step is to open a healthy dialogue with your IT professionals – a dialogue that will allow you to assess more capably your company’s readiness to counter a broad range of exploitation techniques.

Try calling your CISO or CIO and asking these questions:


Continue Reading

October 1st marks the beginning of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM). During October, government and industry work together to raise awareness of cybersecurity issues and help promote educational materials. This year, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is focusing on, “citizen privacy, consumer devices, and ecommerce security.” To assist with NCSAM efforts, the DHS

***UpdateAmendments to the existing data breach notification law are now in effect.*** 

New York Governor Cuomo signed the Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act (SHIELD Act) into law. The law amends the existing data breach notification law and adds new cybersecurity requirements. Amendments to the existing data breach notification law take effect Oct. 2019. The SHIELD Act cyber provisions take effect in March 2020. 

The Governor also signed into law the Identity Theft Prevention and Mitigation Services Act (Act). The Act requires that credit reporting agencies suffering a breach involving Social Security numbers must provide five years of identity theft prevention and mitigation services to affected consumers. The Act becomes effective in September 2019.

Continue reading for a summary of the SHIELD Act and how it could impact your business.
Continue Reading

Welcome back to our three-part series examining cyber vulnerabilities surrounding family offices and steps they can take to mitigate those risks. In Part One we discussed how family offices are particularly vulnerable to cyber-crime. In Part Two, we reviewed different types and  trends of cyberattacks. Here, we will outline how family offices can defend against cyberattacks.

How Family Offices Can Defend Against Cyberattacks

Over a quarter of multi-million dollar family offices do not have dedicated cybersecurity policies in place to protect their systems. This may be because they do not view themselves as needing an onerous cybersecurity policy. However, this view is short-sighted and can leave family offices subject to heavy losses. Family offices do not need to implement large scale or particularly burdensome policies or procedures. Rather, they can build specialized, flexible programs by utilizing a consultant that is reactive to ongoing and updating threats.
Continue Reading

Welcome back to our three-part series examining vulnerabilities surrounding family offices and steps they can take to mitigate those risks. In Part One we discussed how family offices are particularly vulnerable to cyber-crime. Here, we will review different types and trends of cyberattacks.

Cyberattack Trends

Most cyberattacks are the result of “phishing” emails. “Phishing” refers to a deceptive effort to obtain the recipient’s sensitive information by disguising the sender as someone the recipient knows and would trust. Phishing recipients can be deceived into downloading malicious software, providing personal information like account numbers or PINs, wiring funds or paying invoices to cyber-criminals. Ransomware is malware that denies the victim access to their system’s files until the victim pays a ransom. While malware can also take the form of “drive-by” downloading when a victim visits a website prompting the malware to download, over 90% of malware is still delivered via email.
Continue Reading

At least 25% of family offices have been subjects of cyberattacks, and nearly 40% of them lack a cyber security policy. Welcome to a three-part series that will examine the cyber vulnerabilities surrounding family offices and steps they can take to mitigate those risks.

Family Offices Are Particularly Vulnerable to Cyber-Crime

As part of the global increase in the number of billionaires worldwide, family offices have evolved from little more than holding companies to highly sophisticated financial firms managing family wealth, administering assets and acting like a typical private equity or debt fund. Family offices are managing almost 50% of Ultra High Net Worth family wealth. Given the vast amount of wealth that family offices support, they are prime targets for cyber crime, which some analysts project will account for a global $6 trillion cost by 2021.  The fact that nearly 40% of family offices do not even have a cybersecurity policy in place highlights the need for improvement when it comes to making themselves less vulnerable to cybercrime. 
Continue Reading

On May 21, the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA)—an organization comprised of 67 securities regulators within the United States (all fifty states as well as districts and territories), Canada, and Mexico—released a model cybersecurity rule package governing state-registered investment advisors’ cybersecurity and privacy practices.  The model rule package, which would need to be adopted by an individual state so as to become law in that jurisdiction, provides a structure for how state-registered investment advisers must design their information security policies and procedures.
Continue Reading

European Commission Comments on GDPR’s One-Year Anniversary

On the one-year anniversary of the GDPR, Andrus Ansip, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market and Věra Jourová, Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality has released a joint statement on the momentous law: “The main aim of the rules has been to empower people and help them to gain more control over their personal data. This is already happening as people are starting to use their new rights and more than two-third of Europeans have heard of the regulation.”  The entire statement can be found here.

FTC Extends Comment Deadline on Proposed Changes to Safeguards Rule

The FTC has extended the deadline to submit comments on proposed changes to the Safeguards Rule by 60 days until August 2nd.  In March, the FTC announced it was seeking comment on proposed changes to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act’s Safeguards Rule as well as the Privacy Rule. These regulations require financial institutions to inform customers about its information-sharing practices. More information can be found here.

FBI Reports That Cybercrime Cost $2.7B in 2018

The FBI’s annual Internet Crime Report, states that IC3 received 351,936 complaints in 2018 which is about 900 every day. The statement released with the report said, “[t]he most frequently reported complaints were for non-payment/non-delivery scams, extortion, and personal data breaches. The most financially costly complaints involved business email compromise, romance or confidence fraud, and investment scams, which can include Ponzi and pyramid schemes.” More information can be found here.
Continue Reading

Proposed Bill Makes Dramatic Changes To North Carolina Security Breach Notification Law

Some of the proposed changes include:

  • Businesses would have to “[i]implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices, appropriate to the nature of the personal information and the size, complexity, and capabilities of the business.”;
  • Businesses would be required to offer at least two years of free credit monitoring; and
  • Replacing the current “without unreasonable delay” standard for breach notification to “as soon as practicable, but not later than thirty (30) days after discovery of the breach or reason to believe a breach has ”

A copy of the bill can be found here.

24 Tech Companies Support CCPA amendment

According to the DuckDuckGo Blog, 24 different tech companies have written a letter in support of the CCPA amendment. The blog states, “CCPA is set to take effect in 2020 and is without a doubt a major advancement in individual privacy rights for Americans. As an Internet privacy company that empowers users to take control of personal information, we support the law. And we want to see it become even better.” A copy of the letter can be found here.
Continue Reading