Across the country, school districts use technology to facilitate learning and assist in classroom management. From tracking grades and communicating with parents to monitoring bathroom breaks, technology is everywhere in our schools. But as technology becomes more prevalent in the classroom, what does that mean for student data privacy?

Federal Laws Governing Student Data Privacy

There are several federal laws that govern student data privacy. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) protects student educational records and requires the consent of parents or students age 18 or older to consent to the release of education records. The Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) requires parental consent for any federally funded student survey or evaluation that requires the student to provide sensitive information. Lastly, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) regulates companies collecting data about kids under the age of thirteen. Under the law, educational products may not require parental consent, and instead, schools can consent on behalf of parents. Importantly, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is considering updating COPPA’s regulations. The FTC requested comments on the rule in July and held a workshop in October.


Continue Reading Trends in Student Data Privacy

In August, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) approved changes to a video game industry program in an effort to ensure compliance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). This comes after a 2017 study finding that YouTube, the video platform owned by Google, is the most popular online media platform among children, with as many as 80% of children ages 6-12 using it daily. Yet YouTube claims in its Terms of Service that the platform is not intended for anyone under the age of 13, and by agreeing to the terms, consumers affirm that they are indeed at least 13 years old. Users also agree to Google’s privacy policy, which details how Google collects data such as a viewer’s device, location, or phone number, and tailors advertisements and services based on that data.


Continue Reading FTC Under Pressure from Congress to Investigate Violations of Child Privacy Laws