Does your phone immediately unlock for use after you glance at it?  Have you visited your favorite social media platform only to find that you have been tagged in dozens of pictures?  Or how about that time you scanned your fingerprints or eyes to open your phone, gain admittance to a theme park, or pass through airport security?  These features all involve biometrics technology—the latest trend and high-growth area of technology used to help organizations provide consumers with a more effortless and interactive experience in exchange for personal information about your physical or behavioral attributes.  Companies should be mindful in collecting this data and how they use and store that information.

Biometrics include facial, fingerprint, iris, gestures, and voice recognition.  While biometrics technology is becoming more ubiquitous in daily life and being employed by more governmental agencies and service providers, new privacy considerations will continue to emerge as a result of the pieces of personal information shared by consumers to increase convenience.


Continue Reading As Biometrics Technology Permeates Everyday Life, What Laws Should Companies Be Aware Of?

The global coronavirus pandemic continues on, and the cyberattacks and scams continue to multiply.  In the midst of the pandemic, hackers are capitalizing on fears surrounding the outbreak by crafting COVID-19-themed attacks aimed at infecting computers with malware or obtaining sensitive, personal information.  Below are some of the latest examples of attacks and vulnerabilities to be aware of:

Continue Reading Update: Coronavirus Cyberscams and Other Attacks – Scammers Are Still at It

The New York Department of Financial Services (“NYDFS”) has issued a series of Industry Letters requiring regulated institutions to submit information regarding plans to manage risks associated with the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”).  The Letters request descriptions of the entities’ planned responses to a variety of threats posed by COVID-19, including heightened cybersecurity risks.

The four Industry Letters issued by the NYDFS are directed to various regulated entities and require responses regarding the entities’ prospective responses to COVID-19.  Among the required responses are those regarding the regulated entities’ strategies to address specific cybersecurity-related risks, including:


Continue Reading NYDFS Seeks Assurances from Regulated Entities in the Wake of COVID-19

Last week a committee of the Virginia House of Delegates voted to send several privacy-related bills to a legislative commission for study after the current legislative session. Among those bills is the Virginia Privacy Act, proposed as a less onerous version of the California Consumer Privacy Act. Other bills referred for study address topics such as requirements for the destruction of records, online advertising and digital services directed to minors, and safe keeping of biometric data.

The Communications, Technology and Innovation Committee voted to “continue” the these privacy-related bills and directed the chairman of the committee to request the Joint Commission on Technology and Science (JCOTS) to study the legislation in advance of the 2021 legislative session. JCOTS consists of 13 legislators and its purpose is to evaluate emerging technology and science with the goal of promoting the development of sound public policies on those topics.


Continue Reading Virginia Punts Several Privacy-Related Bills to Out of Session Study

For years, we have waited with bated breath the arrival of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) to transform garages into smart factories, cars into autonomous vehicles and ordinary homes into smart homes completely controllable by cellphones. Two technologies underpinning this world of the future (inexpensive sensors and 5G networking) will catalyze this vision in 2020. Gartner predicts that connected devices will rise from 8.4B in 2017 to 20.4B in 2020. While the hurdles for this vision are many (increased regulation, privacy concerns, and the trade war, which may bifurcate the IoT due to geopolitical disputes regarding 5G), the McKinsey Global Institute estimates that IoT technologies will create between $3.9T and $11.1T in economic value globally by 2025. Those interested in capitalizing on this world of the future should be mindful of the legal framework of the future (and near present).

Continue Reading The IOT is Here and so is the Regulation